RSS Feed Not Found – Sun Jan 31 2021

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I tried several RSS feed generators and the one that worked best, aside from being the simplest, was RSS.app. It’s great how useful the tool can be for somebody that doesn’t know how to code.

kirll from st6

Kiril Gantchev

CEO ofST6

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I’ve long wanted an app that generates RSS feeds from social media sites, and while there are other options that do it (IFTTT, Zapier, etc.), this is the first one that is dead simple, and works out of the box.

Isaac Halvorson iOS developer

Isaac Halvorson

iOS Developerhisaac

Wakashio Four Months On: Mauritius Drenched In Oil, Health And Debt Issues

This post was originally published on this site

MAURITIUS-ENVIRONMENT-DISASTER-OIL

Stained mangroves at the beach in Petit Bel Air, due to the oil leaked from vessel MV Wakashio, … [+] belonging to a Japanese company.

AFP via Getty Images

Four months since the Wakashio oil spill, the communities around the South East of Mauritius have been suffering with oil-related health issues, debt and the constant seeping of oil from the coastline that has permeated deep into the sand and silt.

8 Aug 2020: Resistans ek Alternativ were one of the main coordinators of the grassroots driven community boom effort to protect Mauritius from the oil spill

8 Aug 2020: Resistans ek Alternativ were one of the main coordinators of the grassroots driven … [+] community boom effort to protect Mauritius from the oil spill

Rezistans ek Alternativ

Local NGOs who were responsible for the hand stitched community booms to protect Mauritius from the oil spill have accused the under-fire Mauritian Government of creating a ‘mirage’ for the visit of Japanese Foreign Minister, Toshimitsu Motegi. The Japanese Foreign Minister is being welcomed to the country this weekend with a sailing regatta and musical festival around the Wakashio shipwreck, part of which still lies on Mauritius’ reefs.

NGOs are angry at how the community-led efforts that first responded to the oil spill were hijacked by large Japanese corporate interests which appear to be supporting an unpopular Government to cover up the true extent of the oil and salvage damage, and have excluded the local community from taking any ownership in carefully restoring the coral lagoon upon which their livelihoods depend on. In videos and photographs taken this week and released today, they reveal the extent of the oil still present along Mauritius’ coast four months on from the August 6 oil spill.

12 Dec 2020: spokesperson for Mauritian community organization 'Resistanz ek Alternativ', Ashok Subron, speaking at a press conference on 12 December at the same time as the visit by Japan's Foreign Minister Motegi

12 Dec 2020: spokesperson for Mauritian community organization ‘Resistans ek Alternativ’, Ashok … [+] Subron, speaking at a press conference on 12 December at the same time as the visit by Japan’s Foreign Minister Motegi

Resistanz ek Alternativ

The NGOs’ message is clear to the visiting Minister of Foreign Affairs: “We will never forget, we will never forgive, and we demand full restoration and reparations for the physical and psychological damage caused to our island.”

In a press conference earlier today during the visit of Minister Motegi, these groups called for a full apology from the Japanese Government and demanded that Japan conducts a comprehensive investigation into the circumstances of the oil spill, how the response was handled by Japanese organizations, and commit that there will be full community oversight with the clean up response going forward.

Oil, health and debt issues

Video footage taken yesterday reveal the extent to which the oil remains in Mauritius’ waters and coastline. The 3 minute video was taken by local community group Center for Alternative Research and Studies (CARES) and their production company, Rising Ocean. CARES is a Mauritius-based research organization that publishes environmental, social and economic issues around the Indian Ocean. The President of CARES is Ashok Subron, a well known advocate for ecological and social equity issues in Mauritius. He is also the spokesperson for one of the local community groups who led the community oil protection boom efforts, Rezistans ek Alternativ.

Video: oil remains drenched in RAMSAR-protected mangroves

Local NGOs are not just angry against the Mauritian Government – who they accuse of withholding information about the oil spill – but also the fact that Japan’s large ship insurance companies can afford to finance hundreds of international consultants to fly into the country, and yet even the most basic support cannot be given to the local population.

30 Sep 2020: Japan's Foreign Minister Toshimitsu Motegi is on a visit to Mauritius and the Wakashio oil spill over 12 and 13 December 2020

30 Sep 2020: Japan’s Foreign Minister Toshimitsu Motegi is on a visit to Mauritius and the Wakashio … [+] oil spill over 12 and 13 December 2020

Corbis via Getty Images

These community groups have been demanding a basic health assessment center, food assistance and a moratorium on debt repayments for those who are suffering the loss of all economic activity in the region.

They are also angry at what they call the ‘fact-free’ clean up operation by ‘pseudo-Japanese NGOs’ masquerading as international organizations.

Rezistans ek Alternativ is one of the most prominent social organizations in Mauritius who was at the forefront of the community-led boom efforts. Their spokesperson, Ashok Subron, describes what they are still seeing in the South East of Mauritius four months on.

1. Who are Rezistans ek Alternativ?

12 Sep 2020: Rezistans ek Alternativ were one of the organizers of the large, peaceful protest movement in Mahebourg on 12 September against how the oil spill was being handled

12 Sep 2020: Rezistans ek Alternativ were one of the organizers of the large, peaceful protest … [+] movement in Mahebourg on 12 September against how the oil spill was being handled

Rezistans ek Alternativ

Ashok Subron: We are an eco-social movement in Mauritius. We are well known for standing up for environmental issues, particularly in protecting Mauritius’ beaches and unique ecology. We are also known for speaking up against sectarianism and promoting a more united and peaceful pan-Mauritian identity among our multicultural population.

We also work closely with labor organizations on social issues. In particular with ocean-related worker organizations, such as fishing and tourism boat captains, workers in the tuna fisheries industry and seafarers. Our work covers trade unions who represent around 25,000 of the Mauritian workforce.

Ashok Subron, spokesperson for Rezistans ek Alternativ is a well known advocate for environmental and social causes in Mauritius

Ashok Subron, spokesperson for Rezistans ek Alternativ is a well known advocate for environmental … [+] and social causes in Mauritius. Seen here during the oil boom construction efforts on 8 August 2020.

Rezistans ek Alternativ

In Mauritius, we have 300 active members and enjoy the support of 3000 affiliate members. In the 2015 local election, our candidates won 7.1% of the vote. We were involved in a high profile UN Human Rights case to allow political candidates to avoid being forced to be classed by their ethnic identity. Yet the Government has still not put this recommendation in place, in breach of the UN Human Rights pronouncement in 2012.

We are visible in the Mauritian media, and are active in many international and global ecological forums, such as the alternative conferences to the COP Climate Conferences in Paris 2015, Bonn 2017 and Poland 2018.

2. Four months on, what impact has the Wakashio had on the local community?

Ashok Subron: There has been a devastating economic impact, a health impact and an ongoing ecological impact. We have tried to capture some of this in videos taken this week.

The economic impact on the South East of Mauritius has been catastrophic for people living here. The Wakashio had a cascading effect in multiple sectors of the economy. It was a socio-economic shock for thousands of people in this belt

There are three unique factors in how the economy of the South East is structured.

Mahebourg: street food and market stalls with a broad variety gave Mahebourg a unique cultural identity. Such street vendors in the semi-informal sector have been greatest hit with the way the response is being handled.

Mahebourg: street food and market stalls with a broad variety gave Mahebourg a unique cultural … [+] identity. Such street vendors in the semi-informal sector have been greatest hit with the way the response is being handled.

Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images

First, although COVID-19 had impacted international tourism, Mauritius had been focused on using domestic tourists to keep hotels and restaurants functioning. Prior to the oil spill, the middle class of Mauritius would spend their weekends and spare time around Blue Bay and the surrounding coastline of Mahebourg, Ile aux Aigrettes, and on the lagoon. There was economic activity taking place – hotels and water sports were busy. Just look at all the kitesurfers who were around the Wakashio when it grounded.

Second, tourism was the center of a whole range of economic activities. The most visible examples were the front line hotel staff and tourism boat captains. But then there are all the supplier industries. This meant the impact of the oil spill extended far beyond those living and working right on the coastline, but further inland too.

Glass bottom boat tours were very popular around Blue Bay Marine Park for their tours of the famous 1000 year old brain coral

Glass bottom boat tours were very popular with local and international tourists around Blue Bay … [+] Marine Park for their tours of the famous 1000 year old brain coral

Getty Images

The professions impacted included artisanal fishermen, fish-processing family businesses, restaurants, artisanal (tourist) shops, taxi services, tourist car hire firms, hotel staff, beach hawkers, pleasure craft captains, marine guides, watersport guides, artists who perform in hotels along the coast, small planters and breeders, small street food vendors.

With planters and breeders, oil was absorbed into the coastal plantations of the towns of Ti Frere and Grand Sable (where the dead dolphins were found 10 miles away along the coast). This has now raised questions whether the oil could have entered the food chain.

Beach vendors in the informal sector were particularly impacted by the oil spill

Beach vendors in the informal sector were particularly impacted by the oil spill

Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images

Third, there is a large informal economy around the South East for structural and historic reasons. This had a twin effect. It meant many low income occupations, such as beach hawkers, did not have formal employment registration. This resulted in them being overlooked from the current Government assistance programs and they do not have any alternative form of income as they are banned from the lagoon. The other effect is that even if someone was not able to earn an income in the past, they could still go fishing in the lagoon and find a fish to eat or sell locally. This meant that while not wealthy, no-one was ever hungry in Mahebourg. The lagoon always provided. A lot more women were involved in this informal economy.

The Wakashio wreck disrupted all of this. The South East has been brutally hit. We are now seeing begging and genuine hunger – phenomena we have never seen before in this region

Debt and Hunger

Many banks in capital city Port Louis announced large profits this year, while poorer communities were impacted with a debt crisis caused by the consequences of the Wakashio

Many banks in capital city Port Louis announced large profits this year, while poorer communities … [+] were impacted with a debt crisis caused by the consequences of the Wakashio

getty

This has been exacerbated by the way the oil spill response has been handled.

First, large banks continue to demand payment for housing and other consumer debt. Where residents can’t pay, banks are seizing assets such as cars. Homeowners are selling TVs. Restaurants have seen a 80% drop in income. They cannot break even at these numbers. They cannot earn a side income as they cannot fish, nor can they go into the lagoon to fish and eat. It is rapidly developing into a crisis that the local community are getting angry at.

Second, we are seeing the growth of hunger.

Street markets selling fresh fish were very popular in Mahebourg, where people from around the country would come down every day to purchase fresh fish, creating employment for a range of informal support industries

Prior to the oil spill, street markets selling fresh fish were very popular in Mahebourg, where … [+] people from around the country would come down every day to purchase fresh fish, creating employment for a range of informal support industries

getty

We are seeing a spiralling impact. Due to the effect of the debt and unemployment, Rezistans ek Alternativ organized the distribution of food packs soon after the oil spill. Initially, we thought we would only focus on the skippers and those directly impacted by the closure of the lagoon. However, when we started distributing these food packs, we started discovering just how widely the Wakashio oil spill had impacted the region. It was the entire belt of the South East that was suffering.

Food purchases from smaller, informal markets in the South East were particularly impacted, leading to a cascading economic impact

Food purchases from smaller, informal markets in the South East were particularly impacted, leading … [+] to a cascading economic impact. Image prior to the oil spill.

Universal Images Group via Getty Images

We had to enlarge our food pack delivery to meet their needs. This is a region that was historically ignored by the Government with public infrastructure, and this is why social organizations like Rezistans ek Alternativ have such a presence here. There is anger that under COVID-19, large hotel companies and banks have been bailed out with billions of Rupees from our National Reserves, and yet the poorer population of Mauritius most directly impacted by the oil spill are not being registered or supported, forcing NGOs to step in.

It is not just the Government of Mauritius but the international organizations who have not been listening or responding appropriately.

3. What are the health impacts from the oil spill that you are seeing?

8 Aug 2020: The entire region came to Mahebourg waterfront to assist with the oil spill response

8 Aug 2020: The entire region came to Mahebourg waterfront to assist with the oil spill response

Resitans ek Alternativ

We conducted a survey of almost 2500 people and have been shocked at the results, even four months on.

From the earliest days of the oil spill, we had been calling for the Government and the Japanese aid organizations to set up a tent to collect health information from the local community. The capital city is a long way away by bus – a journey that there and back takes an entire day. We needed a place in Mahebourg to collect this information that the local community could get to easily and share there needs and questions.

When the Government, the World Health Organization of Japanese aid organizations did not do this, we had to step in. We set up a tent on Mahebourg waterfront to share information and better understand the needs of the community following the oil spill.

World Health Organization Headquarters, Geneva. Questions have been asked about their role in the oil spill cleanup and health support offered.

World Health Organization Headquarters, Geneva. Questions have been asked about their role in the … [+] oil spill cleanup and health support offered.

AFP via Getty Images

Initially, we only expected to see a few dozen fishermen and tourism boat captains. However, that is when we realized the scale of what was happening.

We surveyed 2457 people.

Of this 2313 (94%) reported adverse health outcomes linked to the Wakashio.

There both physical health issues as well as mental health (trauma and post-traumatic stress syndrome or PTSD) issues.

Our survey was representative of the community, with 49% of respondents being women, and many of those who were pregnant or mothers of young children explaining what they were experiencing too after the oil spill.

The most notable physical health issues were:

An increase in respiratory problems have been reported across the region

An increase in respiratory problems have been reported across the region

getty

  • Respiratory problems. The smell of the oil lingered for weeks in the regions saturated by the oil. Those who worked directly on the spill or who lived in the close vicinity have been experiencing breathing difficulties since the spill.
There has been an increase in skin infections and a darkening of skin conditions

There has been an increase in skin infections and a darkening of skin conditions

getty

  • Skin problems. We are seeing two big issues with skin problems in the region that doctors do not know what to do about. Many of those who made skin contact with the oil have now found their skin has become much darker. The local hospital is unable to treat this, and have not even set up a dedicated triage for those who arrive with oil-spill related symptoms. This is particularly acute for the fishermen and boat captains who entered the oil and went into the lagoon to save it from the oil. In addition to the darkening of the skin, we are also seeing a rise of skin infections. Again, the community has not been given any medical information from those experienced in oil spill about what we are dealing with, and how serious this is.
There have been widespread reports of insomnia across the region

There have been widespread reports of insomnia across the region

getty

  • Insomnia. Many in the region have been unable to sleep for four months. This is triggering further medical complications. We cannot tell whether the insomnia is due to the physical effects of the oil or the mental stress, but it is a real issue, and the Government and Japanese organizations are failing to take these health issues seriously.

We do not know what the effect of the oil spill will be on the many pregnant women or children whose schools are along the coast and who were exposed to the smell and touch of the oil that still remains saturated along our coast. It is an abuse of our human rights.

60% population impacted by Wakashio-linked mental health issues

There has been a widespread reporting of depression and post-traumatic stress around Mauritius impacted by the oil spill

There has been a widespread reporting of depression and post-traumatic stress around Mauritius … [+] impacted by the oil spill

getty

We have also seen a massive increase in those experiencing mental health issues linked to the oil spill.

Most notably, post-traumatic issues and depression. This has now triggered a range of other mental-health related complication such as rising alcoholism, and a family crisis of couple tension and rising separations.

We had a system at our community tent at the waterfront, where we would refer locals inhabitants to other organizations who are better placed to help.

We found that of the 10 people who would approach us, 6 would report mental, psychological and trauma issues.

Even I was shocked by how high these numbers were, even among many close friends who hadn’t shared this before. During the incident of the oil spill, I had moved and was living in Mahebourg for six weeks. We could clearly see in their faces the oil spill impacting the people living there. We could feel their distress.

No-one from the Government ever relocated or spent time here, which is why there were so many protests when they arrived.

Where is the One-Stop-Shop support center?

There have been protests outside Mauritius' parliament at how the oil spill response has been handled

There have been protests outside Mauritius’ parliament at how the oil spill response has been … [+] handled

Resistans ek Alternativ

The local authorities remain detached from local needs. Most Government officials remained in the capital city, which is half a day away by bus. They never took the time to understand the local needs.

We have never seen any visible presence by the World Health Organization or Japanese Organizations who not once offered support to us and the local community to understand their health needs.

What was – and still is – needed is a one-stop-shop that is set up on the Mahebourg Waterfront. It should be easy to access for all the local community. There needs to be a professional understanding and recording of all the symptoms the population is experiencing and this effort needs to be properly supervised by independent organizations.

This one-stop-shop should cover health, social and economic assistance.

The current approach to go to the capital city with formal documentation is not working, and is a broken system.

Trauma of the dolphin deaths

A boy touches the carcass of melon-headed whale at the beach in Grand Sable, Mauritius, on August 26, 2020.

A boy touches the carcass of melon-headed whale at the beach in Grand Sable, Mauritius, on August … [+] 26, 2020.

L’Express Maurice/AFP via Getty Images

I also want to point out the particular trauma of seeing the deaths of the dolphins. That hit the entire country.

The people of the region have a strong emotional connection with Mauritius’ dolphins. For 25 years, I’ve worn a chain of a dolphin around my neck to symbolize the connection we feel with with these wonderful creatures and the ocean.

12 Sep 2020: protests particularly highlighted the trauma of the dead dolphins and whales along Mauritius' coast

12 Sep 2020: protests particularly highlighted the trauma of the dead dolphins and whales along … [+] Mauritius’ coast

Resistans ek Alternativ

These dolphins are like family to us. The fishermen see them in the morning when they go out to fish early in the morning on the edge of the lagoon. Tourists and the local community enjoy playing with them. This was what life was like in our lagoon. They were like family.

The dolphins were a symbol of the intelligence, peace and our symbiotic relation with the ocean.

Seeing so many of them wash up dead on our shores was traumatic. I think about this every day and the images we saw. We could never have imagined this.

Wild dolphin watching was a popular activity for local and international tourists

Wild dolphin watching was a popular activity for local and international tourists

Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images

It was like a mass killing of a family. Especially seeing the way they were then treated and transported on the back of trucks.

We felt a genuine hurt and trauma.

Then, to make matters worse, there has been no explanation of how they died. Until now, we have not received any reports almost four months later. We know their deaths are connected with the Wakashio. Not having an explanation for how they is like not having closure to the death of a loved one.

To this date, there has not been a clear explanation for what caused the whale and dolphin deaths

To this date, there has not been a clear explanation for what caused the whale and dolphin deaths

Resistans ek Alternativ

Yet, there has been no public report, evasive responses in parliament. We also expect the Japanese and international authorities to take their responsibilities seriously.

Separate from the oil spill, this event in itself was a major shock for the entire island. We will never forget them, and will continue to demand answers for how they died.

6. What environmental impacts from the oil spill that you are still seeing?

Even though oil is cleaned, it reappears within two or three days, revealing how much oil is still saturated in the silt and sand along the coastline

Even though oil is cleaned, it reappears within two or three days, revealing how much oil is still … [+] saturated in the silt and sand along the coastline

Photo: Beata Albert

There is still a lot of oil everywhere. There are areas where the oil is dark and saturated in the mangroves and coast. There are other areas where we pump the oil out and a few days later, the oil reappears. We believe the oil is in the groundwater.

There is also a thin film of oil that appears across the lagoon. This is just the visible parts. We do not know what the chemical consequences are of the oil spill or oil in the biological chain. This data is not being collected – either by the Government of the Japanese organizations leading the oil spill response.

We see the oil close to Riviere Creole, the internationally protected Ramsar mangrove forest site of Pointe Jerome, the Mahebourg public theater of Pointe Canon where the cleanup has not even started as the cleanup teams cannot even send pumps here, despite several weeks of trying.

There are fears for the long term consequences of the internationally protected mangrove forests as the toxic oil seeps up the roots of the trees

There are fears for the long term consequences of the internationally protected mangrove forests as … [+] the toxic oil seeps up the roots of the trees

Photo: Beata Albert

When we enter the water, we feel the oil on our feet. We can even smell the oil in various regions. The lagoon has changed.

For the last four months, these regions have been out of bounds to the public. Citizens have been prevented from reporting all of this. The clean up operation has also been conducted in a highly secretive way without any community oversight or accountability. This is totally unacceptable.

So it is incompatible that the lagoon is being opened by the Government to tourism activities for Japan’s Minister of Foreign Affairs, when we are still seeing oil in the lagoon. Where are the responsibilities of the international organizations in certifying whether this is safe?

7. What actions do you wish to see being taken?

Ashok Subron: We don’t want the people of Mauritius to be forgotten by the world.

There are four actions we wish to see being taken: on climate, corporate accountability, peace, and locally here in Mauritius.

Redefining our relationship with nature and the climate

Local groups had to create oil protection booms our of natural materials such as dried sugar cane leaves

Local groups had to create oil protection booms our of natural materials such as dried sugar cane … [+] leaves

Photo: Beata Albert

We want the oil spill to become a lesson – not just for Mauritius and the Indian Ocean, but for the whole of humanity. The spill needs to become a catalyst for humanity to redefine our relationship with our natural treasures and the ocean.

The ocean covers 71% of our planet. It is key to all life on our planet. Without the ocean, there would be no life. Climate change is forcing all of us to reevaluate our relationship with our natural treasures.

Every time we try to take action on climate, we keep hitting big vested interests linked to the ‘extractivist economy.’

Mauritius' most fragile creatures, such as several rare species of crab, were directly drenched by the oil spill

Mauritius’ most fragile creatures, such as several rare species of crab, were directly drenched by … [+] the oil spill

Photo: Beata Albert

The oil spill and climate change are two sides of the same evil coin. The great ocean scientist, Sylvia Earle, said that ocean acidification is the slow but accelerating impact that will overshadow all the oil spills that have ever occurred, put together.

Mauritians are an island people, an ocean nation. We are the ones who will bear the consequences of both sides of this evil coin – the oil spill and the climate crisis.

We are at the front lines of the climate catastrophe and the disaster hurtling fast toward us. We want international institutions, authorities and other nations to have respect for our children.

It is the children of this generation who in fifty years time will already bear the consequences of the climate crisis. We don’t know under what temperatures the planet will be at – whether we will meet the 1.5C target or be three times warmer than this, with all the consequences that will accompany this scenario.

Reign in ‘extractivist’ multinationals

The Wakashio sat on Mauritius' reefs for 12 days before the oil started leaking. Local groups are asking for accountability for what happened.

The Wakashio sat on Mauritius’ reefs for 12 days before the oil started leaking. Local groups are … [+] asking for accountability for what happened.

Photo: Beata Albert

International authorities have struggled to put maritime economic activities within the framework of climate agreements. We need regulations and we need to ensure maritime activities are part of this.

We don’t want money or aid, but we want these bodies to address the climate agreements agreed as part of the UN process. We want you to fight your corporations, State and other vested interests that are threatening our life and those of our children. We must also enshrine the right of nature within our constitutions for nature to become the key determinant of economic and social activities. Economic and social activities should be subordinate to nature’s rights, not the other way round.

Community based clean up efforts proved the most effective against the oil spill in the early days of the leak

Community based clean up efforts proved the most effective against the oil spill in the early days … [+] of the leak

RESISTANS EK ALTERNATIV

We also need to have binding treaties on corporations. We want this to become a reality. For the last thirty years, we have seen a total deregulation of corporate activities around the world. This is taking us to the brink of disaster, as we see what these corporations have done to the planet.

Wakashio was just one oil spill. And it was clear from this, that the people had no say. The company that wrecked their ship on our reef, they are the ones who are now monitoring, testing and cleaning. They have become judge, jury and executor of the actions that should be taken. We have lived here all our lives. Yet we are given no say in their activities in our lagoon. This relation needs to change. It is undemocratic.

We are the ones who are the victims of climate change and the oil spill. Where is our say in all this?

A peaceful ocean

JAPAN-POLITICS-DEFENSE

Japanese Prime Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga sits in the cockpit of a F4EJ Kai jet fighter of … [+] Japan’s Air Self-Defense Force after reviewing the force’s personnel at Iruma Air Base in Sayama on November 28, 2020.

POOL/AFP via Getty Images

We also do not want our country to become a pawn in a broader game of international vested interests, whether economic, military or imperial.

We want to work toward a healthy ocean, but also a peaceful one. We do not want military bases on any island in the Indian Ocean. The proliferation of military bases and installations in our region is alarming, whether on Diego Garcia or Agalega, which have been transformed into bases for external powers.

Maybe it is time to bring back the vision of the Non Aligned Movement from the 1970s. It was a vision that the UN adopted as a resolution to define the Indian Ocean as an Ocean Peace Zone. For the 21st century, this can be reimagined as an ecological peace zone, putting nature first. That is our vision for the future and we invite other nations to collaborate. Together, let’s turn this vision into a reality.

A more responsive State apparatus in Mauritius

Over 100,000 marched in Port Louis on Aug 29 and tens of thousands marched along Mahebourg waterfront on Sep 12 in protest at the Government's response to the oil spill

12 Sep 2020: Over 100,000 marched in Port Louis on Aug 29 and tens of thousands marched along … [+] Mahebourg waterfront on Sep 12 in protest at the Government’s response to the oil spill

Resistans ek Alternativ

Specifically on the Government of Mauritius and the Wakashio oil spill, we have these demands: we don’t want the Government to surrender on reparations.

The Government needs to properly organize, conduct the proper science, and go to international courts of law to sue those who were responsible for the devastation caused to our island.

Whatever the Government chooses to do, we are preparing our own case. Should the Government not assume its responsibility, the people will assume theirs.

Ongoing protests by Resistanz ek Alternativ around Mahebourg calling for a more equal say in how the clean up is being managed

Ongoing protests by Resistanz ek Alternativ around Mahebourg calling for a more equal say in how the … [+] clean up is being managed

Restistanz ek Alternativ

We want to restore the environment to how it was. Before the oil spill and before the climate crisis. We are asking that those responsible for both the oil spill and the climate crisis be automatically liable for reparations. Reparations is a strong word as we will never fully be able to repair the damage caused – it is permanent.

However, we need there to be enough of a deterrent that such an incident never occurs again, anywhere in the world.

We will never forget. We will never forgive. And we demand rehabilitation and reparations now.

FANTASTIC FOUR: Coast sailors in Sydney to Hobart mix

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Peregian Beach sailor Alexander Gough expects his third Sydney to Hobart campaign on super maxi InfoTrack will involve a different and more intense style of racing.

The 27-year-old will be busy as a trimmer on the 30.48m beast come Boxing Day for what will be his fifth journey in the prestigious and world-renowned 628-nautical-mile blue water classic.

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InfoTrack was second in line honours last year and fourth in 2018.

While last year featured four or five super maxis, due to COVID-19 InfoTrack will battle just one other this year, Black Jack, in its category in the 100-strong fleet.

 

InfoTrack and its crew are in strong form, having beaten their rival twice in two key lead up races over the past fortnight during the Cabbage Tree Island Race and Big Boat Challenge.

Gough was anticipating an exciting battle to the River Derwent finish.

“Black Jack are a very good crew and so are we so it’s going to be a good race regardless of who wins or loses,” he said.

“Obviously with the wind, our boat is suited to heavier winds and stronger breezes and rougher conditions whereas Black Jack is suited to more lighter air.

“To be honest it depends on forecast (how we fare), but we’ve proven that we can exceed expectations with that a little bit with that so it’s looking good.”

Gough moved to Peregian two years ago from Brisbane but has spent many a holiday on the Sunshine Coast with his parents owning a holiday house in the region.

He’s a professional sailor and has competed across the world with the Volvo Ocean Race around the world among his feats.

Due to COVID-19 he’s only raced three or four times in 2020 but said he would normally crew in up to 20-30 races a year.

He won’t be the only Sunshine Coast-based sailor to contest the Sydney to Hobart this month.

Here are others to cheer on come the starting cannon on December 26.

 

 

JOHN BANKART

The Mooloolaba resident will be sailing in the new Two-Handed Division on Alex – Team MacAdie with Jock MacAdie.

Sunshine Sailing Australia’s Bankart, who also sailed in the 2007 and 2018 Melbourne Osaka Race, will fill the co-skipper role on the 13.9m long craft.

He competed in last year’s Sydney to Hobart on GYR Ragamuffin which finished 43rd in line honours and 10th in PHS division one.

 

ANDREW SCOTT

The Maroochydore sailor will be part of the crew on Ariel.

He contested his 11th Boxing Day start in the Rolex Sydney Hobart Yacht Race in 2017.

That year he raced on the 45-foot Black Sheep which crossed 47th.

 

 

BOB THOMAS

The Buderim resident, formerly of Mackay, will be a navigator on Cinquante.

He has raced in the Sydney to Hobart more than 25 times.

He was part of the crew that won the infamous 1998 race on Midnight Rambler.

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Banner year for three White Rock artists – Surrey Now-Leader

This post was originally published on this site

In a time of pandemic, decoration has become a viable route to artistic expression.

New decorative banners that have been appearing on White Rock lampposts over the last two weeks not only add colour to the streets but also highlight the work of three different women artists in the city.

And while their personal histories may be diverse, they all share a fine arts background and a desire to celebrate the community in which they live – which is why, they say, the city-sponsored competition for banner designs first announced in the spring resonated with them so strongly.

READ MORE: White Rock calls for street-banner artists

Ultimate winners of the competition were Jennifer Tiles, whose gently-glowing images ‘Starfish’ and ‘Shell’ appear primarily in the Five Corners area; Niki Singleton, whose evocative and animated two-panel painting ‘Kitesurfer’ can be seen mostly on West Beach; and Tracy Hetherington, whose bold, print-like ‘Crab’ and ‘Seagull’ designs are mainly installed in the East Beach area.

While much of Tiles’ background in graphic work has been in creating logos for companies and clothing, she also contributed banners to White Rock before, when the city was undergoing re-branding in 2012.

“That’s why when I saw the latest competition advertised, I jumped at it,” she said. “I needed an outlet to be visually creative and connected.”

She explained her starfish design is made up of multiple dots of many colours – possibly the first ‘pointillist’ banner in White Rock’s history, she agreed, with a laugh – while the shell design incorporates the colours of the rainbow crosswalk at Five Corners in direct reference to the city’s LGBTQ+ community.

“I was looking for images that were simple things that people go down to the beach for,” she said, adding that she also wanted to express, symbolically, “that White Rock is growing and becoming more inclusive.”

Singleton, a Squamish-born full-time artist who worked out of her own studio in Brooklyn, New York for some 20 years, has been a White Rock resident for the past year-and-a-half.

While her preferred medium has been larger oil paintings on board – for which she makes her own oil paints – of late, she has been concentrating on smaller pieces on watercolour paper using acrylic paints and oil pastels to provide loose, semi-abstract colour fields, with superimposed imagery in ink.

That was the technique used in her design for ‘Kitesurfer,’ which, she explained, is actually a single image cut in two.

“When I saw the call for artists in the spring, COVID was already here,” she said. “I was going down to the beach every day… and drawing everything I saw, then going back and making paintings. When I saw the call for banners for White Rock, I thought ‘this is perfect, because that’s what I’m already doing.’”

Singleton said she is glad that her design for the banners is perceived as uplifting.

“That’s what I was hoping for,” she said. “I wanted to bring a lot of colour to the area, against the sky, because that’s what it feels like in White Rock – it’s always light and bright here, even when it’s raining.”

Hetherington, meanwhile, acknowledges that she’s more of a ‘weekend warrior’ in making art, as her full-time occupation is marketing supervisor for Surrey Libraries.

But she is always on the look-out for passion projects in illustration, she said.

And as a member of Surrey Libraries design team, she has also gained experience in digital drawing, she said.

That came in useful in creating her hard-line images, she said, for which she did some meticulous study of gulls, and crab shells she found on the beach.

“I was imagining them to look like linoleum prints,” she said of the final appearance of the work.

“Being from a city background as far as my day job is concerned, I was enjoying creating images of nature that would be seen in the air, from a distance.”

Like the other artists, she lives close to where the banners are displayed, she said.

“I thought participating in this project would be such a delightful way to express local pride – and share with the community why I love being here.”

For more information and examples of the work of each artist, visit https://hallgallery.wordpress.com/jennifer-tiles/, nikisingletonstudio.com, or (for Hetherington) carvingapath.com



alex.browne@peacearchnews.com

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Banner year for three White Rock artists – BC Local News

This post was originally published on this site

In a time of pandemic, decoration has become a viable route to artistic expression.

New decorative banners that have been appearing on White Rock lampposts over the last two weeks not only add colour to the streets but also highlight the work of three different women artists in the city.

And while their personal histories may be diverse, they all share a fine arts background and a desire to celebrate the community in which they live – which is why, they say, the city-sponsored competition for banner designs first announced in the spring resonated with them so strongly.

READ MORE: White Rock calls for street-banner artists

Ultimate winners of the competition were Jennifer Tiles, whose gently-glowing images ‘Starfish’ and ‘Shell’ appear primarily in the Five Corners area; Niki Singleton, whose evocative and animated two-panel painting ‘Kitesurfer’ can be seen mostly on West Beach; and Tracy Hetherington, whose bold, print-like ‘Crab’ and ‘Seagull’ designs are mainly installed in the East Beach area.

While much of Tiles’ background in graphic work has been in creating logos for companies and clothing, she also contributed banners to White Rock before, when the city was undergoing re-branding in 2012.

“That’s why when I saw the latest competition advertised, I jumped at it,” she said. “I needed an outlet to be visually creative and connected.”

She explained her starfish design is made up of multiple dots of many colours – possibly the first ‘pointillist’ banner in White Rock’s history, she agreed, with a laugh – while the shell design incorporates the colours of the rainbow crosswalk at Five Corners in direct reference to the city’s LGBTQ+ community.

“I was looking for images that were simple things that people go down to the beach for,” she said, adding that she also wanted to express, symbolically, “that White Rock is growing and becoming more inclusive.”

Singleton, a Squamish-born full-time artist who worked out of her own studio in Brooklyn, New York for some 20 years, has been a White Rock resident for the past year-and-a-half.

While her preferred medium has been larger oil paintings on board – for which she makes her own oil paints – of late, she has been concentrating on smaller pieces on watercolour paper using acrylic paints and oil pastels to provide loose, semi-abstract colour fields, with superimposed imagery in ink.

That was the technique used in her design for ‘Kitesurfer,’ which, she explained, is actually a single image cut in two.

“When I saw the call for artists in the spring, COVID was already here,” she said. “I was going down to the beach every day… and drawing everything I saw, then going back and making paintings. When I saw the call for banners for White Rock, I thought ‘this is perfect, because that’s what I’m already doing.’”

Singleton said she is glad that her design for the banners is perceived as uplifting.

“That’s what I was hoping for,” she said. “I wanted to bring a lot of colour to the area, against the sky, because that’s what it feels like in White Rock – it’s always light and bright here, even when it’s raining.”

Hetherington, meanwhile, acknowledges that she’s more of a ‘weekend warrior’ in making art, as her full-time occupation is marketing supervisor for Surrey Libraries.

But she is always on the look-out for passion projects in illustration, she said.

And as a member of Surrey Libraries design team, she has also gained experience in digital drawing, she said.

That came in useful in creating her hard-line images, she said, for which she did some meticulous study of gulls, and crab shells she found on the beach.

“I was imagining them to look like linoleum prints,” she said of the final appearance of the work.

“Being from a city background as far as my day job is concerned, I was enjoying creating images of nature that would be seen in the air, from a distance.”

Like the other artists, she lives close to where the banners are displayed, she said.

“I thought participating in this project would be such a delightful way to express local pride – and share with the community why I love being here.”

For more information and examples of the work of each artist, visit https://hallgallery.wordpress.com/jennifer-tiles/, nikisingletonstudio.com, or (for Hetherington) carvingapath.com


alex.browne@peacearchnews.comLike us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Peace Arch News

Sponsored: How to make the most of a long winter sun stay in Dubai

This post was originally published on this site

Whether you’re here for 10 days, two weeks or more this glittering metropolis has an endless supply of wonderful activities to enjoy

Visitors are spoilt for choice when it comes to filling their sunny days in Dubai. The city is already blessed with beautiful beaches, rich culture and incredible dining – and that’s before you head out to explore the desert. A long stay here? Easy. And the weather, especially during our British winter, is perfect for every kind of escape.

Classic experiences

Whether you’re a first time visitor or not, a trip to Dubai isn’t complete with visiting the top of the Burj Khalifa. A staggering 828 meters tall, it’s three times as tall as the Eiffel Tower and nearly twice as tall as the Empire State Building. The view from the two observatories At The Top and At The Top Sky are pretty astounding. At its base you’ll find the all-singing all-dancing Dubai Fountain, with shows every afternoon and evening. For a taste of old Dubai take a tour on a traditional abra boat across the creek and delve into the emirate’s fascinating history at the Dubai Museum and the Etihad Museum. 

Relax at the beach

Dubai not only has beautiful warm weather and sunshine, but some of the most incredible beaches, too. Best of all, many are free to access, so you can eat, relax and play shoreside for as long as you like. Some of the most popular spots are Sunset Beach, Kite Beach and La Mer. If you get bored sunbathing, almost every watersport you can imagine is on offer in Dubai, from jetskiing to wakeboarding to kitesurfing. 

Kite surfing on a beach

Fun for all: whether you like watersports or just taking it easy on the sun-lounger, the beaches have something for everyone

Credit:
Getty

Taste Emirati cuisine  

A longer stay provides time to dine on authentic cuisine. Al Fanar conjures up the Dubai of old and serves home-style favourites such as maleh (salt-cured fish) and naghar mashwi (spiced grilled squid), while the old creekside neighbourhoods of Bur Dubai and Deira are brimming with Arabic restaurants. A walking tour with Frying Pan Adventures will also give you an excellent introduction to local food. 

Retreat to the mountains

Hatta, in the Hajar Mountains, is a picturesque exclave just 90 minutes’ drive inland from downtown Dubai. Here you can contrast your time in the city with hiking, biking and kayaking the tranquil waters of Hatta Dam.

Kayaking in Hatta

Get back to nature: enjoy a mindful moment kayaking on the tranquil waters of Hatta Dam

Credit:
Getty

Get active

With world-class courses and a glorious ten hours of sunshine a day, golf is hugely popular for holidaymakers in Dubai. If that’s not your thing, there’s paddleboarding around Palm Jumeirah as well as cycling and beach yoga. Adventurous types are spoilt for choice with paragliding, skydiving, hot-air ballooning, go-karting and urban ziplining on offer across the city. Sports enthusiasts will enjoy the Dubai Fitness Challenge (DFC).  Taking place 29 October to 27 November 2021, DFC is a month-long celebration of health and fitness, including free workouts and fitness events across the city.

Hit the shops

From markets to malls to souks, shopping in Dubai is an unforgettable experience. The Dubai Mall, for example has a musical fountain, aquarium, ice-rink, VR park and a dinosaur skeleton, as well as shops and restaurants. But if you really want to get under the skin of the city, head to the Dubai Creek area (which can also be explored by abra boat) for the traditional souks, where you can find everything from spices and hand-woven textiles to perfume and gold.

Unwind at the sea

Fancy some pampering in world-class surroundings? Head to one of the city’s many decadent spas, where ancient hammams and classic Arabian products mix with new-age treatments on the menus. For a taste of ancient Arabia, try the Shiffa hammam at Fairmont The Palm – a vigorous body exfoliation followed by an indulgent heated rose clay body mask. Or experience a more unusual treatment at Caesars Bluewaters Dubai, where you can burn up to 600 calories on the Iyashi Dome – a tanning-bed like structure that uses state-of-the-art infrared rays to eliminate toxins from the body. 

Explore the art scene

Alserkal Avenue, a collection of warehouse galleries, and d3, the Dubai Design District, are both must-sees, as are City Walks Dubai Walls, a collaboration by 16 of the world’s top street artists. Opened in late 2018, the spacious Jameel Arts Centre has a fantastic collection of contemporary art, while the beautiful Jumeirah Mosque is one of the few open to non-Muslims. The Dubai International Financial Centre (DIFC) may not sound like the most obvious place for fine art, but is in fact home to an array of galleries, as well as the stunning new Grand Mosque, which has a beautiful facade of carved wood latticework and stained glass.

Jameel Arts Centre

For the art lovers: find Jameel Arts Centre on the Dubai Creek

Credit:
Beno Saradzic

Evening entertainment

Head to the beautiful dhow-shaped Dubai Opera for an evening of opera or ballet, or enjoy the spectacular performance art show of La Perle by Dragone. For dinner, explore the luxury side of Dubai’s dining scene at Pierchic’s romantic overwater restaurant or enjoy At.mosphere’s breathtaking views at the top of Burj Khalifa.

Be a big kid

From IMG Worlds of Adventure (the world’s biggest indoor theme park) to Dubai Parks & Resorts, there are rides aplenty in Dubai. And don’t forget the water parks, such as Wild Wadi, which has been thrilling visitors with its wave pool, water slides and artificial surfing machines since 1998.

Embrace the desert

There are many ways to experience the city’s desert surrounds. Platinum Heritage’s Al Marmoom Bedouin Experience includes traditional food and cultural lessons about the oldest inhabitants of the region. A visit to the Dubai Desert Conservation Reserve provides the chance to see wild oryx, falcons and camels, while Arabian Adventures can take you on a desert safari, complete with dune bashing, camel riding and sand surfing. 

Camel riding across the desert

Get lost in the dunes: head to the desert for a truly authentic experience

Credit:
Alamy

Broaden your horizons in Dubai 

In Dubai, you’ll find all the right ingredients for a sun-soaked trip. The sophisticated metropolis by the sea provides unforgettable experiences, from serene safaris in the desert to dining in the world’s tallest building. Broaden your horizons with a trip that takes in its exhilarating mix of record-breaking architecture, traditional neighbourhoods and white sand beaches. You’ll return home with plenty of tales to share.

Find out more at, visitdubai.com

How Coast hall of famer became kitesurfing pioneer

This post was originally published on this site

A chance encounter on the shores of Cairns not only sparked a trailblazing kiteboarding career but proved a life changing experience for Rebecca Colefax.

Colefax, a world and national kiteboarding champion, was inducted into the Sunshine Coast Sports Hall of Fame at USC Stadium on Thursday.

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The Noosa resident earned the prestigious honour in recognition of a remarkable career across Australia and the world.

Among her achievements Colefax won back-to-back national titles in 2002 and 2003 and came third at the Kiteboard Pro World Tour stop in 2002.

In 2003, she won the Big Air titles, Australian kite league, the Suncorp Sports Star of The Year award (Queensland) and became the first Australian to win a world championship in kiteboarding.

A fledgling and little known sport in the 1990s, Colefax said her journey to world kiteboarding domination started with a visit to a Cairns beach where she first witnessed the sport and met the man who would become her future husband.

“I saw him (Mathew) arrive at the beach and he set up the kite and disappeared for the next six hours over the horizon,” she said.

“I’d seen windsurfing before but I was really mesmerised by this guy and sport.

“So, I bought a kite off him and I started kitesurfing.”

Mathew was Australia’s first kiteboarder.

From there it was a whirlwind journey.

“There were bumps and bruises all over me because it was quite a learning curve,” she said.

“But, that story continued and I ended up competing as a kiteboarder in the women’s division and being one of the first kiteboarders – there were not many women in that division.

“I kept persisting and I was running clinics and then I became an instructor and became the first female examiner in the world, so I was training trainers.”

Colefax said she was honoured to be inducted into the hall of game and join a long and prestigious list of elite stars.

“Kitesurfing back in the 2000s was still really a developing sport and very much in it’s infancy,” she said.

“So, to be part of that and to be a pioneer of the women’s division was really challenging sometimes because no one really knew what they were doing.

“But, now it’s a fully fledged sport and I feel really proud to be able to stand here and represent the women that are doing the sport and that also helped me get to where I am.”

She praised her husband for sparking her passion all those years ago in Cairns.

“I owe a lot of this to him because if it wasn’t for him I would’ve never have started.”

These days she enjoys passing on her knowledge to her three kids Matias, 14, Rivalee, 12, and Stryder, 10.

Certificate of merit awards were also presented on Thursday to Ian Grant (surf lifesaving), Helen Park (water polo) and Lyndsay Halson (AFL) who worked tirelessly contributing to the

success of their respective sports on the Sunshine Coast.

A 44-year-old man who police say was doing a burnout before he crashed on the way to a high school formal has fronted court.

Complaints ranging from newsagency fights to secret payments from casino bosses have been made against councillors this year.

A Coast mum says urgent safety upgrades are needed to her town’s skate park, saying youths are terrifying locals.

It will be four years before Lightning goal shooter Peace Proscovia could return to her birth place. But for now, she says, the Coast is home.

A grief-stricken Sunshine Coast family has farewelled toddler Llewella Ro Page after she died in a tragic accident at Palmwoods.

A random search of a Coast man’s car revealed his treasure chest of illegal items including ecstasy, 29.28g of marijuana, a flick knife and a bullet.

Winter call-out for Abersoch RNLI following report of a kitesurfer in difficulty | RNLI

This post was originally published on this site

Our volunteer crew were paged at 11.08am on Saturday 5 December 2020 to reports of a kitesurfer in difficulty off Machroes beach.

With a keen northerly wind blowing and a moderate sea-state the lifeboat was launched at 11.20am and arrived on scene within 5 minutes where the casualty had managed to return to the beach.

With the casualty in the care of HM Coastguard the lifeboat went to retrieve the kitesurfer’s equipment from the sea and then returned to the lifeboat station. Both the lifeboat and crew kit was then thoroughly washed down and sanitised and left ready for service.

An Abersoch RNLI spokesperson said: ‘We want to reassure the community that we are still here for them throughout the winter months and should you spot anybody in difficulty, or if you get into difficulty yourself, call 999 and ask for the Coastguard. Always have a means of calling for help and let someone know your expected return time’.

Notes to editors

· Abersoch Lifeboat Station has been operating for just over 150 years. To learn more about the lifeboat station go tohttps://rnli.org/find-my-nearest/lifeboat-stations/abersoch-lifeboat-station

· The current B Class Atlantic 85 Lifeboat launches to a variety of both commercial and leisure craft call-outs

RNLI Picture Caption

The photo of the inshore lifeboat is a library image which was taken before Covid-19 restrictions.

RNLI media contacts

For more information please telephone Sarah Leather, RNLI Volunteer Lifeboat Press Officer on 07583 084338 or sarah_leather@rnli.org.uk or Eleri Robers, Regional Media Officer on 01745 585162 or 07771 941390 e:e.eleri.roberts@rnli.org.uk or contact the RNLI Press Office on 01202 336789.

Key facts about the RNLI

The RNLI charity saves lives at sea. Its volunteers provide a 24-hour search and rescue service around the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland coasts. The RNLI operates over 238 lifeboat stations in the UK and Ireland and, in a normal year, more than 240 lifeguard units on beaches around the UK and Channel Islands. The RNLI is independent of Coastguard and government and depends on voluntary donations and legacies to maintain its rescue service. Since the RNLI was founded in 1824, its lifeboat crews and lifeguards have saved over 142,700 lives.

Learn more about the RNLI

For more information please visit the RNLI website or Facebook, Twitter and YouTube. News releases, videos and photos are available on the News Centre.

Contacting the RNLI – public enquiries

Members of the public may contact the RNLI on 0300 300 9990 (UK) or 1800 991802 (Ireland) or by email.

ISPO Brandnew 2021: These start-ups have won

This post was originally published on this site

ISPO Brandnew Winner 2020

“The role of ISPO Brandnew has never been more important than it is today,” says Franziska Zindl, Head of ISPO Award & Innovations at Messe München.

“Under the current conditions, it is particularly challenging for start-ups to establish themselves in the sports industry and penetrate the market. We offer them a prestigious platform and stage for their ideas. We also give the industry orientation and retailers specific new suggestions for possible diversification, for example.”

ISPO_Brandnew_190826_Trophy_Messe_München
These are the Winners of ISPO Brandnew 2021

ISPO Brandnew 2021 Winners at a Glance

Winners at ISPO Brandnew reflect diversity of the industry

In order to give space to the inventive talent and the often unconventional ideas of the start-up scene, the jury has decided not to score in predetermined categories. The ten winners, like all of the submissions, cover all kinds of disciplines and concepts – from winter sports to fitness, yoga and water sports, from accessories to clothing and hardware, as well as software solutions.

But one thing was apparent with all of the applications: Sustainability and climate neutrality are an established part of the companies’ philosophies and the inventors are taking them to the next level.

The winning companies will make their grand entrance at the digital edition of ISPO Munich, from February 1 to 5, 2021. Both the 10 winners and the 20 selected brands will present themselves in their own virtual showrooms (brand rooms). On Monday, February 1, the first of them will also make their pitches for the title of overall winner live in front of an online audience.

ISPO Munich Logo at the fair
Benefit from the advantages of ISPO Munich Online. All information about the premiere of the digital event from February 1 to 5.

Take Part!

The ISPO Brandnew 2021 Winners at a Glance

Agogic (Italy, 2020)

Weatherproof 2.0 – with its Agogic Outerwear product line, the start-up Agogic is bringing classic rainwear, outdoor lifestyle and athleisure luxury to the big city. The target group includes active, working women between 30 and 50 years old. The products combine timeless classic design and robust, sustainably produced material into a unique modular layering. To extend the lifecycle of each piece of clothing, Agogic also offers a repair and buyback system.

ajuma(Germany, 2019)

Individualized sun protection for every skin type – thanks to the UV-Bodyguard, sunburns are a thing of the past. The little UV measuring device from the start-up ajuma can be worn on a wristband or attached to a backpack. Working together with the app for Android or iOS, the UV-Bodyguard shows the current UV intensity in real time, the individual UV exposure, the personal UV dose and the remaining time the user can remain in the sun without harm.

AUFTRIIB (Sswitzerland, 2019)

Like big paws: CRAMPOW is a combination of crampons and snow shoe. The Swiss start-up AUFTRIIB has developed this climbing support especially for ski mountaineers and freeriders. On the last few meters to the summit these wide and light plates give the user a boost in the deep snow, while the integrated front teeth offer the grip of crampons, even on massive patches of ice. The carbon fiber compound panels come with a stable and light strap system and are easy to store. Depending on the package, €20 to €60 will be donated to POW (Protect Our Winters) Switzerland.

AYAQ(Switzerland, 2020)

Sustainable, elaborate, clever – the start-up AYAQ is a new brand for ecological and functional ski touring clothing that meets the highest technical requirements. AYAQ makes a strong impression with its own solutions for tour hikers’ everyday life. The Forno vest can be taken off easily, even from underneath a jacket and backpack, while the Nunatak Hybrid Pants come with an innovative, comfortable design in the crotch especially for ski touring.

Maporto(Poland, 2020)

Anyone who spends a long time out and about with baggage knows it all too well – eventually every backpack starts to feel heavy. The start-up Maporto has developed the Relief System, a special device that takes the weight of the backpack off the shoulders: Two braces optimally transfer the weight to the hip belt. The patented system can be attached to almost any backpack, child carrier or other carrying device. The best part: Maporto will also make it possible for people who have back or shoulder pain to wear backpacks

Skibrid(France, 2019)

Carving for all: In just a few minutes, the SKIBRID Neo turns normal skis or snowboards into a hybrid of mountain bike and board, without damaging the equipment. Riders can effortlessly steer the board by tilting or twisting the handlebars. Even beginners should be able to make fast carving turns in no time at all – without putting strain on their joints

Southern Shores (Germany, 2019)

Yoga mats made from natural rubber are the first choice for many yogis – the slip resistance is unparalleled. Now the start-up Southern Shores is making rubber mats sustainable, too, with The Ocean Mat. They are soft, stable and trendy, and are made from FSC certified natural rubber as well as recycled plastic bottles. Plus no waste is generated during production. The mat’s natural colors convey a sense of calm during exercise. The start-up is also making a statement: One percent of their revenue will go toward the protection of dolphins and whales.

Veloine  Women Cycling Apparel (Germany, 2019)

Sports and pregnancy are not mutually exclusive – many female cyclists remain active during pregnancy. That’s why Veloine has developed Women Cycling Apparel – cycling gear for women that combines style and performance with comfort, even during pregnancy. The Veloine Pregnancy Cycling Kit helps pregnant cyclists to enjoy their sport for as long as possible. The parts grow with the bump: The jersey has a special fabric fold that expands as necessary. Special cuts provide support, while the soft material has very low compression. The company has set itself the goal of making cycling more feminine overall.

West Kiteboarding(Germany, 2018)

Full control, more safety: With Klick.ma, the start-up West Kiteboarding has patented a magnetic safety binding for kite surfers. The Klick.ma board contains two magnets with an adhesive force of 120 kilograms each and the metal plates are inside the matching shoes. What’s more, the release units are individually adjustable. To start, the riders need only jump onto the board and they’re ready to go. In case they fall, the board releases, minimizing the risk of injury.

YourCoaching(Germany, 2020)

Content is king and the market for personal trainers in the sports business is growing – the software start-up YourCoaching offers fitness trainers and influencers a tool to quickly and easily create individual apps for their respective target group. Training applications, diet plans, programs, advertising and voucher campaigns, stories… The customer takes care of the content, YourCoaching deals with the entire implementation of the app for iOS, Android and web. No knowledge of programming is required.